Project Coordinator: Definition, Functions, Responsibilities, Skills, and How To Be One?

Project Coordinator: Definition, Skills, Responsibilities, Role and What It Does?

Yad Senapathy, PMP May 16, 2023

The project coordinator oversees the project's planning, organization, and coordination in order to ensure its successful conclusion. Asset management, task coordination, and progress monitoring are all under their purview. They help project managers by making plans, setting deadlines, and assigning tasks. 

The coordinator's role is to ensure that everyone involved in the project is kept up to date on its progress. They keep an eye on things to make sure the project stays on track, stays under budget, and produces high-quality results. Technical and interpersonal skills are required for a career as a project coordinator. These include the ability to communicate effectively, organize and prioritize tasks, solve problems, pay close attention to detail, manage time effectively, and lead others. 

A degree in project management, business, or a related field, together with related experience, is helpful for entering the field of project coordination. The Project Management Professional (PMP) or Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) credential is another approach to stand out to potential employers.

What Is a Project Coordinator?

A project coordinator is an expert in managing projects through careful preparation and collaboration between team members. They collaborate closely with project managers to create plans, establish deadlines, and delegate responsibilities. Coordinators for projects keep an eye on things, look for trouble spots, and devise plans to fix them. 

They must keep the rest of the team, as well as any interested parties and clients, apprised of the project's development through regular status reports. Project coordinators are responsible for ensuring all project deliverables are completed on time and within budget. They are essential to a project's success because they ensure it stays on track and under budget. Generally, project coordinators are highly competent experts who lead groups to victory.

What Are the Functions of A Project Coordinator?

Planning, organizing, and keeping track of how far along a project is in its execution are all part of a project coordinator's responsibilities. It ensures that work is done as efficiently and effectively as possible. A project coordinator is a person in charge of making sure that everything needed for the project is available and being used efficiently. Program planners collaborate with project managers to define objectives, a financial plan, and a timetable. Furthermore, project coordinators assign assignments to team members and monitor their progress to ensure that everyone is contributing to the project's success. They keep an eye on how things are going, report any problems they see, and work on fixes.

Project coordinators are responsible for making sure all project deliverables are completed on time and up to snuff. Project coordinators collaborate closely with vendors and suppliers to ensure timely, cost-effective delivery of all required hardware and software for a program. A project coordinator's primary responsibilities include managing resources, developing and implementing a plan, coordinating project activities, and keeping tabs on how things are coming along.

What Are the Main Responsibilities of A Project Coordinator?

The primary obligation of a project coordinator resides in ensuring the timely, cost-effective, and satisfactory fulfillment of a project for all stakeholders involved. Project coordinators collaborate closely with managers to devise comprehensive project plans, schedules, and budgets. They bear the responsibility of orchestrating project activities, delegating tasks to team members, and diligently monitoring progress to ensure adherence to established timelines. 

Project coordinators engage in effective communication with team members, stakeholders, and clients, thereby ensuring that all pertinent individuals remain well-informed of project advancements and any necessary modifications. They undertake the identification and mitigation of potential project risks while upholding stringent quality standards for project deliverables. 

They provide valuable administrative support to project managers, maintaining meticulous documentation and records and generating reports on project status to apprise both project managers and stakeholders. Project coordinators substantially contribute to the triumphant realization of projects by adhering to timelines and upholding organization and financial prudence.

What Skills Are Needed to Become a Successful Project Coordinator?

Listed below are the Skills Needed to Become a Successful Project Coordinator.

  • Communication skills: Project coordinators need to communicate effectively with teammates, stakeholders, and clients to ensure everyone is on the same page.

  • Organization skills: They must be skilled at organizing and prioritizing tasks, resources, and timelines to ensure the project is completed on time.

  • Problem-solving skills: Project coordinators must be able to identify potential issues, analyze information, and come up with creative solutions to problems that are likely to happen during the project.

  • Attention to detail: They need strong attention to detail to ensure project deliverables meet quality standards.

  • Time management skills: Project coordinators need to manage their time effectively and prioritize tasks to ensure that the project is completed on schedule.

  • Leadership skills: They must motivate and lead a team to ensure everyone is working towards the same goal.

  • Technical skills: They need a basic understanding of project management software, such as Microsoft Project or Asana, to help with project planning and management.

  • Interpersonal skills: Project coordinators must be able to build relationships with team members, stakeholders, and clients to ensure that everyone is working together effectively.

project coordinator skills

Overall, a successful project coordinator should have well-rounded technical and soft skills to help them manage projects effectively and efficiently.

How to Become a Project Coordinator?

The role of a project coordinator is to ensure that projects are completed on time, within budget, and to the satisfaction of stakeholders. Some of the project coordinator job descriptions include communicating with team members, stakeholders, and clients. 

Listed below are the steps on How to Become a Project Coordinator.

  1. Gain relevant education: A degree in project management, business administration, or a related field is helpful to start someone’s career as a project coordinator.

  2. Develop relevant skills: Project coordinators need to have good communication, problem-solving, and organizational skills. A person is able to develop these skills through relevant work experience, internships, or volunteering.

  3. Get relevant work experience: They are likely to start as an assistant or junior project coordinator in a company to gain practical experience.

  4. Obtain relevant certifications: Obtaining a certification in project management, such as the Project Management Professional (PMP) certification, adds value to an individual's resume.

  5. Build a professional network: Networking with other project coordinators or project managers helps one learn about job opportunities and gain knowledge about the industry.

What Certification Do I Need to Be a Project Coordinator?

There is no specific certification required to become a project coordinator. However, obtaining a certification in project management is beneficial for individuals who want to pursue a career in project coordination or management. 

The most widely recognized project management certification is the Project Management Professional (PMP) certification, which is offered by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Individuals must have a minimum of three years of experience in project management, as well as pass a rigorous exam that tests their knowledge of project management processes, tools, and techniques to obtain a PMP certification. 

Other project management certifications that are helpful for project coordinators include the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) certification,  the PRINCE2 certification and CPC (Certified Project Coordinator). While these certifications are not required for project coordination roles, they demonstrate a candidate's knowledge and skills in project management and are therefore preferred by some employers. Ultimately, the specific certification needed to be a project coordinator depends on the organization's requirements and the candidate's qualifications and career goals.

What Are the Key Steps in The Project Coordination Process?

The project coordination process involves several key steps to ensure that projects are completed successfully and efficiently. 

Listed below are the Key Steps in the Project Coordination Process.

  1. Planning: It involves defining the project scope, objectives, and requirements, as well as identifying the resources and timeline needed to complete the project.

  2. Organizing: The step involves identifying the key stakeholders, project team members, and their roles and responsibilities. It involves setting up the project communication plan and establishing project management tools and processes.

  3. Execution: Such a step involves implementing the project plan, including tasks such as scheduling, task allocation, and risk management. It involves monitoring project progress, identifying and addressing any issues, and communicating project updates to stakeholders.

  4. Monitoring and Controlling: Monitoring and controlling involve tracking project progress against the project plan, identifying any variances, and taking corrective action as needed. The step  involves managing changes to the project scope or requirements, and ensuring that the project stays on track and within budget constraints.

  5. Closing: The step involves finalizing all project deliverables, conducting a project review, and documenting lessons learned. It involves communicating project outcomes and results to stakeholders and transitioning any ongoing project work to relevant teams or individuals.

What Are the Challenges that Project Coordinator Faced?

Project coordinators face a number of challenges in their roles. One of the main challenges is managing competing priorities, as they often have multiple projects to coordinate at the same time. 

It requires them to be highly organized, proactive, and able to prioritize tasks effectively. They must be able to communicate effectively with team members, stakeholders, and vendors, which is challenging when working with diverse groups of people who have different priorities, perspectives, and communication styles. 

Another challenge is managing project timelines and budgets, as project coordinators must ensure that the project stays on track and within budget constraints. They must be able to identify and address potential risks and issues that arise during the project's execution. 

Additionally, project coordinators must be able to adapt to changing circumstances and adjust project plans as needed to ensure project success. Overall, the role of the project coordinator is challenging but rewarding for those who enjoy working in a fast-paced, dynamic environment and are committed to ensuring the success of a project.

What Level Is the Project Coordinator Concerning Project Management?

The project coordinator role is typically considered an entry-level position in project management. Project coordinators support project managers in the planning, execution, and successful completion of projects. They are responsible for tasks such as project scheduling, communication, documentation, and tracking project progress. While project coordinators do not typically have the same level of authority as project managers, they play a critical role in ensuring that the project runs smoothly and that all team members are working effectively together. 

Project coordinators are likely to be promoted to a project management role with greater responsibility and authority over the project's execution and delivery as they gain experience and develop their skills. They must hone their skills in the project management processes where planning, executing, monitoring, and controlling are always involved. Therefore, while the project coordinator role is an important one, it is generally considered to be at a lower level than that of a project manager.

What Is the Next Position After Being a Project Coordinator?

The next position after being a project coordinator is often that of a project manager. It is common practice to go on to the role of project manager after gaining experience as a project coordinator. It is possible for a project coordinator to be promoted to the post of project manager as they acquire experience and develop their abilities in project management. Such a role has significantly more responsibility and power over the execution and delivery of the project. 

Project managers are responsible for the oversight of the planning, organization, and execution of projects. It includes the management of finances, resources, timeframes, and communication with stakeholders. They are accountable for seeing to it that the project is finished on schedule, without going over its allotted budget, and to the stakeholders' total satisfaction. Further possible next stages for a project coordinator depend on the structure of the company and the requirements that must be met. 

These possible future steps include responsibilities in program management or portfolio management. A project coordinator has the option of specializing in a particular aspect of project management, such as risk management or quality assurance, in order to broaden their expertise in the field.

What Is the Average Salary of A Project Coordinator?

The average basic salary of a project coordinator is $52,533 per year. However, the average salary of a project coordinator varies depending on factors such as industry, location, and experience.  A project coordinator's salary ranges from around $38,000 to over $75,000 per year. 

Factors such as the industry, location, and level of experience significantly affect the salary of a project coordinator. For example, project coordinators working in the IT industry tend to have higher salaries than those working in non-profit organizations. Additionally, project coordinators with several years of experience earn higher salaries than those who are just starting in the role.

Is Being a Project Coordinator Easy?

No, Being a project coordinator is not necessarily an easy job, as it requires a variety of skills and competencies. Project coordinators are responsible for ensuring that projects are completed on time, on budget, and to the satisfaction of stakeholders. They must be able to manage multiple tasks simultaneously, be detail-oriented, and have strong organizational skills. They must be able to communicate effectively with a variety of stakeholders, including team members, clients, and vendors. 

Additionally, project coordinators must be able to adapt to changing circumstances and identify and address potential issues before they become major problems. It requires critical thinking skills and the ability to work well under pressure. Generally, those who appreciate working in a fast-paced, dynamic atmosphere and are dedicated to ensuring the success of a project are likely to find being a project coordinator to be a tough but gratifying occupation. 

Is the Coordinator Higher than The Project Manager?

No, the position of coordinator is not higher than that of project manager. In fact, the project manager is typically a more senior position with greater responsibility and authority. While the project coordinator plays a critical role in the successful execution of a project by ensuring effective communication, coordination, and documentation, they are generally responsible for executing specific tasks and supporting the project manager. 

The project manager has overall responsibility for the project's success, including developing project plans, managing budgets, timelines, and resources, identifying and managing risks, and ensuring that the project meets stakeholder expectations. The project manager must even make critical decisions that affect the project's outcome and direction. The project manager holds a higher-level position and is ultimately responsible for the project's success or failure while both positions are important and complementary.

Is Project Coordinator a Good Role?

Yes, being a project coordinator is a good role. The project coordinator's role is rewarding for those who enjoy working in a fast-paced, dynamic environment and have strong organizational and communication skills. An individual is going to have the opportunity to work on a variety of projects, interact with different stakeholders, and help ensure the success of the project as a project coordinator. 

The role requires someone to be detail-oriented, proactive, and able to handle multiple tasks simultaneously. They need to work closely with other team members to ensure that everyone is on the same page, and they are responsible for keeping track of project timelines, schedules, and budgets. 

The project coordinator role is an excellent stepping stone to a project management career, as it provides valuable experience and exposure to the project management process. Overall, if a person enjoy working in a collaborative environment, have strong organizational skills, and are committed to ensuring the success of a project, then the project coordinator role is a great fit for them.

Is the Project Coordinator the Same as The Project Manager?

No, a project coordinator is not the same as a project manager. While project coordination and project management are related, they are not the same thing. Project management involves the overall planning, organizing, directing, and controlling of a project, while project coordination focuses on the day-to-day coordination of project activities, communication, and collaboration among team members, stakeholders, and vendors. 

On the other hand, project coordination involves tasks such as scheduling meetings, tracking project timelines, and managing project documentation. A project coordinator in construction works closely with the project manager to ensure that everything runs smoothly and that everyone is on the same page. 

However, the project coordinator's role is more focused on the execution of the project plan, while the project manager has a broader responsibility for the project's overall success. They require different sets of skills and expertise, but both play an important role in construction projects.  

Is Project Coordinator a Difficult Job?

Yes, being a project coordinator is a difficult job. The work of project coordination is likely to be tough since it requires managing the day-to-day activities of a project while ensuring that everything is operating properly and according to the established timeline. A project coordinator's responsibilities include organizing different teams, ensuring that everyone is working towards the same goals and deadlines, and maintaining constant communication with the project's many stakeholders. 

Furthermore, they are responsible for keeping track of project spending and managing budgets, as well as identifying and addressing possible difficulties and blockages before they become big ones. Such a role demands good organizational, problem-solving, communication, and interpersonal skills, as well as strong problem-solving and organizing abilities. 

Furthermore, those in charge of coordinating projects need to be able to juggle many responsibilities at once and efficiently organize their work in order to guarantee that nothing important is going to be overlooked. For instance, if an individual is someone who thrives in a fast-paced, dynamic workplace and is dedicated to ensuring the success of a project, then project coordination is a career that presents someone with a number of challenges and even offers a number of opportunities for professional growth.

What Is the Difference Between Project Coordination and Project Management?

Project coordination and project management play essential roles in ensuring the successful completion of a project, but they involve different sets of tasks and responsibilities. Project management involves planning, organizing, directing, and controlling resources, activities, and tasks to achieve specific goals within a predetermined timeframe and budget. 

It encompasses a broad range of activities, from defining project scope to risk management and quality assurance. On the other hand, project coordination focuses on the day-to-day coordination of project activities, communication, and collaboration among team members, stakeholders, and vendors. It includes scheduling meetings, managing documentation, monitoring progress, and ensuring everyone is on the same page. 

Project coordinators focus on the details to ensure tasks are executed efficiently and effectively, while project managers oversee the big picture. Understanding the differences between project coordination vs project management is vital for companies to ensure that the right individuals are in the appropriate roles and responsibilities, and to guarantee the successful completion of projects.


pmp 35 contact hoursSatisfies 35 contact hours

Corporate Head Quarters
Project Management Training Institute
4835 LBJ Freeway, Suite 220
Dallas, TX 75244-6004

Contact Us
Customer Service: (734) 786-0104
Sales (Toll Free): (866) 540-3126
Fax: (248) 809-4060
Email: [email protected]
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8AM - 5PM (CST)

'PMI', 'PMP', 'CAPM', 'OPM3', 'PMI-ACP', 'Project Management Professional', 'Certified Associate in Project Management', and 'PMBOK' are trade marks of Project Management Institute, Inc. The PMI Registered Education Provider logo is a registered mark of the Project Management Institute, Inc. | Premier PMI Authorized Training Provider (ATP)

Project Management Training Institute, PMTI, PMT Institute are registered as trademarks of Olympus Services, LLC in the State of Michigan.